Biography of Queen of Inglaterra Carolina (1683-1737)

Queen Consort of England from 1727 until his death, married to Jorge II. Born 1 March 1683 at Ansbach and died 20 November 1737 in London.

Daughter of the margrave of Brandenburg, Juan Federico, after the death of his father in 1687, was driven first to the courts of Dresden and then Berlin's. Due to its elevated position he/she received a careful education, which was not neglected philosophical formation, a distinctly naturalistic, nor the fundamental principles of Christianity; to the extent that Carolina was seen as one of the most educated women of her time. Since I was very young it was projected that Carolina enter into marriage with the Archduke Carlos of Austria, but while the talks were initiated, the marriage did not practice. Finally this was betrothed to the elector of Hanover, future King of Inglaterra Jorge II, with whom he/she married in the year 1705, when he/she was 22 years old.

The ascent to the throne of Jorge I, her husband was named Prince of Wales, by which both moved to London, where Carolina attempted to cultivate the friendship of some of the intellectuals and most outstanding politicians of the time. Thus in his house were held large number of meetings in which the Princess was conspicuous by his great intelligence. Described by his contemporaries as a very beautiful woman of strong religious principles and possessor of a great sense for handling political affairs, he/she knew how to take advantage of their position to consolidate the interests of the House of Hanover in England. On the other hand should point out that at all times he/she tried to reconcile the positions of the Crown and of the English monarch, which clashed on numerous occasions. When her husband fell into misfortune he/she accompanied him to his retirement from Richmond, but they dropped to influential friends in the capital, which formed a solid group of opposition to the monarch, who strongly supported the cause of the Prince of Wales.

The rise to power of Jorge II in the year 1727 marked the beginning of the direct intervention of Carolina in the political life of the country, so despite the great selflessness that her husband felt by the Affairs of State, it was able to act with great prudence and intelligence. In this way it pressured her husband to remain as Prime Minister sir Robert Walpole, in which Carolina saw a very skilled statesman and above all a great ally. Little by little the new Queen was adapting to its new position and while he/she was always contrary to the liberal system which prevailed in England, did everything possible to maintain the harmony between the Parliament and the monarchy, without neglecting thus the smooth running of the economy, which was a good way to win the will of the people.

The continuous absence of Jorge II made Carolina to occupy the post of Regent on numerous occasions, although this in no time acted as its position officially since he/she refused to swear their charge; Since he/she expressed his conviction that her husband function take the reins of the nation, although he/she was aware the limitations of this privately. Thus the own Archbishop of Canterbury on his deathbed pressed it so it agreed to his oath, since the oath empower it to carry out numerous religious functions within the structure of the Anglican Church.

Equipped with a broad vision of State we can say that until his death he/she directed English politics, not only by the manifest inability of her husband, but also by his own personal concern. Carolina also from its position tried to encourage culture, as well was one of the main benefactors of Queen's College building will take place.

The Queen Carolina died in London November 20, 1731, at the age of 54. After the funeral, his remains were deposited in Westminister Abbey.

Bibliography

VICENS VIVES, J. modern general history. 18th - 20th. (Barcelona, Vicens Vives, 1997).

CEPEDA, j., MARTIN, M., FRANCO, g., MARIN, f., MART├ŹNEZ, e., CAPEL, R. Handbook of Universal history. The 18th century. (Madrid, history 16, 1992).