Biography of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911)

English botanist, born in 1817 and died in 1911, who did important work on botanical geography and provided notable support, personal and scientific, CharlesDarwin. He graduated in medicine in 1839 by the University of Glasgow, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the Antarctic expedition, who directed Sir James Ross. Good knowledge of Botany (his father was William Jackson Hooker, director of the Botanic Gardens), during this trip, Joseph Hooker studied the Antarctic flora, and on his return published The Botany of the Antarctic Voyage of H.M. Discovery Ships Erebus and Terror in 1839-1843 (1844-60).

Linked to the Botanic Gardens, he was appointed Deputy Director of the institution in 1855. He subsequently succeeded his father in the direction, position he occupied between 1865 and 1885. From his research position at Kew, Hooker performed many scientific journeys throughout the globe, whose scientific findings published in large 'flora': Flora Novae Zelandiae (1853-55) and Flora Tasmanica (1855-60) and Flora of British India (1855-97). Prepared, Furthermore, different editions of classic works of Bentham on the flora of Great Britain and carried out studies on the North African vegetation and Southwestern United States.

All these works gave Hooker an encyclopedic knowledge of the terrestrial flora and made him one of the most notable authorities in phytogeography of his time.